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New Class Schedule

April Promotion 2016

 

 
New Address and Location San Gabriel School Click Here
 

 

 

 

 

Chul Jin Martial Arts have been in business since 1979 with schools in Lake Balboa Ca, San Gabriel Ca, and Korea

 

The term taekwondo was coined in 1955 by South Korean Gen. Choi Hong-hi and thus he was controversially credited as the art’s founder. The art draws from Japanese karate and Korea’s oldest martial art, taekkyon. Taekwondo was born of power struggles. Along with Nam Tae-hi and Han Cha-kyo, Gen. Choi Hong-hi adopted the Ch’ang Ho School (Kwan) of Taekwondo patterns from their original Oh Do Kwan. To unify the new martial kwans under a single banner, the Korea Taekwondo Association was formalized in 1959/1961. Then in 1966, KTA member Gen. Choi Hong-hi formed a splinter group called the International Taekwon-Do Federation, while others created the World Taekwondo Federation. The formation of taekwondo has arguably led to more disunity than unity. Because taekwondo has its footing in the Korean military, where the hands are considered too valuable to be used in combat, taekwondo emphasizes kicking skills. The spirit of taekwondo is secretly hidden in the written calligraphy of the words. The motion of the strikes and blocks are revealed by the brush strokes’ order and in the direction in which the word is written.  

Hapkido is a Korean martial art that is written with the same three Chinese characters as aikido. Hapkido’s techniques, however, bear little resemblance to aikido’s. Although Choi Yong-sul is credited with founding hapkido, it’s probably more accurate to say that hapkido arose from a collaborative effort among a small group of Korean nationals (Ji Han-jae, Kim Moo-hong, Suh Bok-sub and Myung Jae-nam) following the period of Japanese colonialism in Korea.  
Hapkido originally focused on pressure-point strikes, joint locks and throws, but now, thanks to the influence of hapkido expert Ji Han-jae, it also includes highly refined kicks and hand strikes. Various weapons are taught, including the cane (perhaps influenced by French savate), staff and belt. Development of the practitioner’s ki (life force) is also stressed. Hapkido, which doesn’t have any forms, is usually considered a self-defense style rather than a martial sport.
         
Kumdo is a modern martial art of fencing, the Korean equivalent of Japanese kendo. It is also romanized as kumdo, gumdo, or geomdo. The name means "the way of the sword," using the same Chinese characters as kendo. The main differences between kendo and kumdo are stylistic. Kumdo practitioners generally favor a dynamic style of play, focusing on using fast and aggressive small motion strikes to create openings for attacks. Kendo practitioners however, tend to focus on the perfect single strike, waiting patiently to find an opening and the correct timing to land an attack typically larger in motion than a kumdo stylist.   
  Iaido was largely influenced by Hayashinizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu (1546-1621) who coined the term iaijutsu, the first Japanese art of sword drawing. Created by Nakayama Hakudo in the 1930s, iaido literally means “the way of mental presence and immediate reaction” but is now known as “the way of sword drawing.” Although battojutsu was the term used in the 1400s to encompass sword drawing, iaido includes the arts of drawing, striking, removing blood from the blade and sheathing the sword. A perfect wrist snap of the hand should shake the blood off the sword before sheathing. Iaido practitioners work with real blades and scabbards, which makes learning its sword tactics, strategies and techniques more realistic and intense.  
     
Brazilian jiu-jitsu is a martial art and combat sport that teaches a smaller person how to defend himself against a larger adversary by using leverage and proper technique. The Gracie family, the founders of BJJ, modified judo and traditional Japanese jujutsu to create the art. It contains stand-up maneuvers, but it is most famous for its devastating ground-fighting techniques. Gaining superior positioning—so one can apply the style’s numerous chokes, holds, locks and joint manipulations on an opponent—is the key in BJJ. BJJ’s roots began in the early 1900s. Esai Maeda—the chief of a Japanese immigration colony who was assigned to Brazil—befriended Gastao Gracie. Maeda, a former jujutsu champion in Japan, taught the art to Gracie’s son, Carlos. In 1925, Carlos and his four brothers opened the first jiu-jitsu school in Brazil. Carlos’ younger brother, Helio, adjusted the techniques to suit his small frame, thereby creating Brazilian jiu-jitsu. In the early ’80s, Helio’s son, Rorion, planted the seeds of BJJ in the United States, where the art has become immensely popular. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu’s roots began in the early 1900s. Esai Maeda, the chief of a Japanese immigration colony who was assigned to Brazil, befriended Gastao Gracie. Maeda, a former jujutsu champion in Japan, taught the art to Gracie’s son, Carlos. In 1925, Carlos and his four brothers opened the first Jiu-Jitsu school in Brazil. Carlos’ younger brother, Helio, adjusted the techniques to suit his small frame, thereby creating Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. In the early ’80s, Helio’s son, Rorion, planted the seeds of BJJ in the United States, where the art has become immensely popular.  
 
   

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